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. >>> well on come to wourd wide exchange. as is an decide barrels towards the east code, u.s. authorities order thousands to evacuate for the the biggest storm. >> my first message is to all the people across the eastern seaboard atlantic going north that you need to take this very seriously. >> all u.s. stock markets will be closed today. its first weather related closures in 27 years. and shares in ubs rise in the open after reports swiss bank may cut 10,000 investment banking jobs and wind down up to 15 trading businesses. police wen and his family fight back. their lawyers call it untrue and are considering legal action against the "new york times." for our u.s. viewers, the show will be on just one hour this week because europes has gone off daylight savings time, so we're just four hours ahead now of new york time. hurricane sandy is also still several hours away from make landfall, but the impact of the storm is already being felt. transportation has ground to a halt as new york and other major eastern cities have shut down mass transit, airlines canceling flights and
. now residents belong a long and costly recovery process. >> the u.s. markets are set to reopen after being closed the last few days. the new york mass transit system is still shut down. >>> new sthats now expect profit growth to hit the slowest since lifting. >>> welcome to today's show. the good news is financial markets start trading again. >> well, good news or it depends on how they open. certainly there's people with pent up demand. >> i think whatever happens, the fact that we're back up and trading is a good thing. >> the interesting question is why. but why couldn't the new york stock exchange have gone with its electronic trading systems. will this serve as a catalyst to maybe pursue that route the next time with more confidence. >> it's a day of cleanup. >> yes, it is. millions of people in the northeastern u.s. will spend days or weeks to recover from sandy, which is being blamed for at least 46 deaths. at its peak, more than 8.5 million homes and businesses were without power. new york city and new jersey, especially the jersey shore, were the hardest hit. president obama
questions about security at the u.s. consulate in benghazi and whether the death of ambassador chris stevens and three others could have been prevented. >>> bullying backlash. a television anchor responds to a viewer who criticizes her for being overweight. >> attacks like this are not okay. >> this is the "cbs morning news" for wednesday, october 3, 2012. good morning. good to be with you. i'm terrell brown. round one tonight. this evening president obama and mitt romney face off in the first of three scheduled debates. the topic tonight in denver domestic affairs including the economy, health care reform and immigration and the clock is ticking. the election is less than five weeks away and the stakes are high. susan mcginnis is in washington. good morning to you? >> reporter: first debates get the most attention of all of them and the first 30 minutes are said to be the most important. president obama needs to hold on to the momentum he's built. mitt romney needs to turn the entire race around with tens of millions of people watching tonight. the stage is built. the cameras are in place.
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
. >> thank you. thanks to having us again and again. i'm a u.s. correspondent for swiss newspapers but i have a question for you, henry. you haven't mentioned the governor of ohio at all in your analysis. was that on purpose or you don't think he plays a role? >> i've never found that governors matter a whole lot in presidential races. they don't poll states along with it. they can help of volunteer but their stamping or their popularity almost never actually comes over. the one thing i should've mentioned, i didn't though, is that the case it raise from two years ago is a good indicator. made ronnie's weakness. which is that john kasich after he left congress came from an investment bank backer and accuse running against somebody, before he was governor, was a representative from that west virginia part of ohio, and they rent a class warfare campaign. it was eyes on the side of the working class man, he comes on the site of the wealthy. and kasich in the atmosphere by 2010 only won by about two points. and if you look, he did much better in the affluent suburbs than he did in working-class a
to con convenience the debate to discuss a topic that's quite critical and the u.s. china relationship is definitely most strategic bilateral relationship. tonight's program will include 90 minutes of unintrumpted -- uninterpreted of key u.s.-china relations, and then we conclude with a question and answer period that would be questions collected from all of you, and as well as audience from around the world, twitter, e-mail, and live stream. the format we have this evening is based on the guidelines published by the commission on presidential debates, and there are two sections of questions. professor, one of the co-moderators, will address the first with six questions, and the other co-moderator direct the questions in the second section with six questions. speakers each have a minute and a half to respond followed by a 30-second rebuttal, and in keeping with proper debate decorum, i want to review a number of rules of engagement. first of all, please take the time now to take out your mobile phones and anything that makes noise and switch to the silent mode. what you can do secondly
through those trillions of dollars spent by the u.s. government each year. >> reporter: what you might not know about the federal deficit. a guided tour in and around washington, d.c. with the "wall street journal's" david wesson. >> woodruff: we have another in our series of topics not being talked about in the campaign. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can
the debate's focus, the september 11 terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, is expected to come up again. as sharyl attkisson reports, some are asking why american military help from outside libya never came. >> reporter: cbs news has been told that hours into the assault, an unmanned predator drone was sent over the u.s. mission in benghazi. it and other reconnaissance aircraft apparently observed the final hours of the protracted battle. a white house official won't detail the president's actions but told us at the start of the attack, military leaders look at available options and the ones we exercised had our military forces arrive in less than 24 hours, well ahead of timelines laid out in establishes policies. the official went on to add that a small group of reinforcements was sent from tripoli to benghazi, but declined to say how many or what time they arrived. that didn't help ambassador christopher stevens and three others who were killed. military sources tell cbs news that resources at nearby u.s. bases, sigonella, aviano, and souda bay, including planes which
mentioned, the fact checker here at u.s.a. today will be looking at this debate and figuring out who is telling you the absolute truth about that they believe and what they are saying about your debate. also, as we said, 11:00, we wrap up the entire thing on 9news. back to you in the studio. >> we'll be watching on air and online, derek. thank you. >>> ten years ago tonight, we were struggling to come to terms with what happened earlier in the day. four people shot out of nowhere killed in montgomery county and before the day was over, a fifth would die standing on a street corner in the district. it was really the first day of the terror that would grip this region for three straight weeks. as john allen mohommed and john malvo went on a shooting spree. they were caught at a rest stop off i-70 in meyersville, maryland. that's where police gathered a will lot of their evidence for their conviction. >> i'm scott broom in prince georges county where ten years after the sniper attacks, the archives and the evidence have been handed over to cure tores tures. there sits that 1990 capri
, a grim milestone in the war in afghanistan. the death toll for u.s. troops has now reached 2,000. the most recent deaths came this weekend. two americans killed when a fire fight broke out between u.s. forces and their afghan army allies. the afghan defense ministry said the battle was a result of a quote, misunderstanding between international forces and afghan soldiers. >> i think the signature attack that we're beginning to see is going to be the insider attack. >> this is something we have to discuss in detail, something that i feel a responsibility to correct. >> more than 50 international security assistants and four service members have been killed this year in attacks between u.s. forces and the afghan counterparts. an investigation is underway into the latest incident. [ yelling ] >> violence in the streets of pakistan after a former lawmaker makes a very strong and disturbing request. the ex pakistani politician told protestors he would pay $200,000 to whoever kills -- kills the u.s. film maker behind the anti-islam film. it is said to mock the prophet mohammed that
saddam hussein. that only happened because of the u.s. invasion of iraq. but then even after the u.s. invasion and the toppling of hussein -- pusan -- a secular liberal government that was willing to cede some of its sovereign rights to a foreign power. some claim it's all different now with the islamic republic because the arab awakening, the demonstration effect will work together with sanctions to find the break the back of the islamic republic. but this ignores the fact that the islamic republic sees the arab awakening as hugely positive, hugely positive. iranian policymakers and analysts believe that any arab government, any arab government that becomes at all more representative of its populations beliefs, concerns and policy preferences will, by definition, be less enthusiastic about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to
now reach the u.s. >>> officials are calling it the worst case of hoarding they've seen. dozens of 18-wheelers needed to clear it away. now, help for the horder. >>> and one honest cabbie. returning nearly $250,000 in cash, believe it or not. getting a measly reward in return. making us ask, what would you do? >>> and good morning, everyone. we begin this tuesday with jerry sandusky refusing to go quietly to his sentencing day. >> almost a year after the public first learned of the penn state child sex abuse investigation, sandusky will learn his fate later today. but he's already lashing out with a defiant statement of innocence and charges of conspiracy. >> abc's t.j. winick is in bellefonte, pennsylvania. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning. that's right. jerry sandusky faces a sentence of 10 to more than 218 years. last night, we got a sneak preview of the statement he will read here at the court today. jerry sandusky now regrets not taking the stand in his own defense, after being convicted of 48 counts of sex abuse against young boys. for the last ten months, he's been
heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing toy in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
are unavoidable. the weapons found at his murder scene were traced to the u.s. run scandal we know as operation fast and furious. many involved in that scandal fear the same could be true here. however, deputies say in this case, no weapons were recovered and no suspects are in custody. we'll tell you the search continues. bill? >> what a tragedy that is. william lajeunesse working that story in los angeles. thank you. >>> some internal state department documents now giving us a closer look at how u.s. officials handle security in libya. only two months before the attack on our consulate in benghazi, which killed four americans. fox news has obtained news documents just as two top republican lawmakers sent a letter to the secretary of state hillary clinton. in that letter, darrell issa and jason chain asked how much the department knew about at least a dozen threats to our ambassador. what else are these lawmakers saying here? >> accounts from whistle blowers, top republicans claiming at least 12 security related incidents before the consulate attack, including this rpg attack in benghazi on ju
suisse 3r50iprivate bank. as an investor as we watch the maturation of the u.s. election campaign, what actually matters some. >> the fiscal cliff. obviously many things matter at the more detailed level, as well, but we're all worried about how that will be sorted out and the way that the white house goes, the way congress goes is pretty critical to that. >> have you heard anything from anybody that made you more comfortable, or is it just a big -- how do we price it in? >> when we talk to investor, the line we're getting is people believe that everything will be sort of all right on the night and that some neat compromise will be found. and that is the best central guess, but that's still worrying because it means you've got some if you like good news in the market and if things were to go wrong hfr- >> how would we price things going wrong? >> we would see a selloff in all sorts of assets. clearly in stocks and treasuries could go either way. but who knows. >> obviously we have to find out whether each party will budge on these core issues. we asked john mccain about this and we'll g
the chairman of the house of endangering several libyans who have been working with the u.s. by not giving their names when he released 166 pages unclassified libya documents. heading tomorrow night's foreign policy debate are, i have to say, more confusing to me as a consumer of news than they have ever been. we talked about this early on. i will put myself in the category of people who were troubled. category of people who were troubled by what seemed to be a distance between what the reporting and what the intelligence agency seemed to be saying and what was coming out of the white house. i thought that gab was worrisome. we talked about it on the show. i don't know what to think anymore because what looked like it first was officially the u.s. government line was this was spontaneous and in reaction to the video. there was a parallel channel of reporting indicating it was premeditated, the work of al qaeda militants and had nothing to do with the video. there was no protest in the video. that is what happened. now we have reporting from the l.a. times and "the new york times" talking t
. >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. at approximately 6:15 a.m. eastern time, former u.s. senator george mcgovern passed away while in hospice in sioux falls, south dakota. he was 90 years old. an early opponent of the vietnam war he was, the nominee for president in 1972 for democrats. he lost in a landslide election to republican richard nixon. in a statement, the mcgovern family said "we are blessed to know that our father lived a long, successful and productive life. advocating for the hungry, fighting for peace." mcgovern long will be remembered for his unwavering opposition to war and war is where we begin this morning. today we're taking you back to june 28th, 1914. yes. june 28, 1914. that was the day that a foreign emissary was assassinated while on a diplomatic mission in sarajevo. that set off a chain of events that led to the largest global conflict the world had ever seen. on that fateful day, a 19-year-old took the life of arch duke franz ferdinand. knowing the dead to the austrian hungarian empire would not go unanswered, serbia appealed to their russian neighbors f
in the west faster and cheaper and, therefore, using that to age, take away some of the u.s. market share. they have been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than what other countries around the world are making. they therefore substantial increase their share of the global solar panel market. the problem is they have not been so good in the domestic consumption side. chinese companies export 95% of the solar panels they produce. that's a big from for a lot of chinese citizens and ngos because there sank this is supposed to be about green energy but what we're getting is the factors that make solar panels and have a lot of pollution from the factory. and we are expert in the solar panels to the united states. to u.s. citizens have cleaner air but we do not. that's a really big problem. that's an old model. the old model. the new model would be if they cannot only create the manufacturing solar panel but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than what we have to. but also in staunton and consum
start" begins now. >>> it came out warning. riveting new details of the attack in libya that killed a u.s. ambassador, a different story than we were told. >>> a battle over big bird. shout out to both candidates on the campaign trail, now sesame street is saying stop! >>> racial balance under the microscope of the supreme court. justices argue today over affirmative action and college admissions. big "newsday" here. good morning, welcome to "early start. "i'm john berman. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. the state department is giving its most detailed account of the speed, severity and calculation behind last month's attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi in libya. the house oversight committee will weigh in on security failings during a hearing scheduled for later today. the state department saying the attack was not a spontaneous offshoot of protest and saying u.s. and security personnel in benghazi were outmanned and no reasonable security presentation could have fended off the assault. u.s. ambassador christopher stephens and three others were killed in the attack. arwa damon helps peace to
sandy is expected to pack a huge punch when it hits the u.s. forecasts call for the storm to return it hurricane strength and while the timing and location of sandy's landfall is unclear, people are bracing along the eastern seaboard. governors in new york, pennsylvania, maryland, they've issued states of emergency while the limited state of emergency is in effect for maine. >>> meanwhile, the governor of delaware is prepared mandatory evacuations if sandy remains on its current path and in nearby virginia 300 national guardsmen could put on recovery efforts after sandy passes through that state. for those of you traveling this weekend, sandy is certainly going to have an impact. several airlines are announcing they will change their fees. >>> meteorologist alexandria steele joins us now. we're talking about maine and maryland and where is the storm now? >> maine to miami beach. you're talking about airport delays and cancellations and you could think of tens of millions being impacted. boston, new york, washington, dulles, reagan national. i mean, every major airport on the eastern
kelley. >> and i'm laura garcia-cannon. a public memorial is being held today for a u.s. ambassador and bay area native killed in the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. christopher stevens was killed, also killed a computer expert and two ex-navy s.e.a.l.s. bob redell joins us live in san francisco where thousands of expected to turn out for today's memorial for stevens. he also has new details on the investigation into that attack. good morning, bob. >> reporter: good morning, laura. the family of ambassador christopher stevens has invited the family to attend the memorial service. it will take place around 4:30 this afternoon in san francisco city hall in the rotunda. several hundred people are expected to attend. stevens was from the bay area, having lived in piedmont, graduated from cal and the uc hastings law school before entering the foreign service, eventually becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya. his brother and sister are supposed to speak at today's service. also in attendance, libya's ambassador to the united states, senator diane feinstein, and thomas pickering, th
, and now it's got her to the doorsteps of the u.s. supreme court. one thing i'd like to agree with ms. bowie on is where the rubber meets the road is k-12 # education. the reason we have a bold argument is the big gap in the academic qualifications and various racial groups coming out of high school and first grade for that matter, and that's where we should be pouring our energy and our resources, and i want to be clear, i am by no means saying that what students of color should not be at the best universities, but if they are admitted under similar standards or even slightly different standards from the other students, they are not harmed. it's great. the problem is not whether you're a student of color. it could happen to an athlete. if you were taken into a university, it's very much less prepared academically than your classmates, it's likely to harm you. if you are well qualified, you'll do fine. >> host: next call from sandy, cleveland, ohio, democrats' line. go ahead. >> caller: [inaudible] you don't have statistics to prove that students that are admitted are in the program f
's representatives in the u.s. senate. senator tester will go first, followed by rep river. >> i want to thank everybody in the audience and on the panel and everyone who is listening tonight. how many people in this audience are from the silly -- the city of billings. raise your hand. thank you very much. congressman rewhberg is suing each and everyone of you. i have talked about montana and people working together. the first thing you do when you've got a grass fire, the firefighters put it out and they put their but on their line and you do not respond and say thank you by filing a lawsuit, which is exactly what he did. that is not moving the committee forward. it has been a pleasure for the last six years to represent the great state of montana. people like thomas, who is a veteran in afghanistan and is still a part of active military. he lost part of his legs and an arm. he will have prosthetic legs at some point. to be able to move forward, those people give me a drive for this job. a person like lisa jones, who is a cancer survivor. she went to a committee health center that would not h
the morale of foreign troops serving in the war zone. u.s. military officials say an attack on saturday that killed two americans was especially unnerving as several afghan soldiers and possibly insurgents opened fire from several directions. nbc's chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, has been covering this war for almost the full 11 years. he filed this report from kabul. >> reporter: this woman is about to die. executed for adultery. the man she was with got off scot-free. the taliban recently filmed this video of their justice as a warning and to say they're making a comeback. some 30 miles away in the village, we saw few signs of what the u.s. would consider progress in afghanistan and no evidence that the american plan to hand over to a credible, stable afghan government will work. these village elders tell me once u.s. troops leave, a civil war will begin, and u.s.-trained afghan forces will not be able to stop it. are you preparing for this fight? are you already stockpiling weapons and ammunition and getting yourself ready? "yes, we are. we will definitely fight," he says
, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-lateshutdown since 1
on shocking conditions of solitary confinement inside the u.s.. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!,", the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in san rafael, broadcasting from the community media center. both the u.s. and iran are denying claims of having reached an agreement in principle for direct one-on-one nuclear talks. the new york times reported saturday a deal had been struck between u.s. diplomats and top iranian officials reporting to ayatollah ali khamenei. iran is said to have asked the talks be delayed until after the upcoming november elections so they could know with whom they'd be sitting down. but in a statement, the white house said -- speaking to journalists, the iranian foreign minister also denied the report. like don't have anything these discussions or negotiations with america. yes, we had negotiations [indiscernible] 5 nations. if it is about nuclear talks, the talks are going on. except for that, we have no discussions with the united states >> the news comes as iran grapples with a plunging cur
there is no particular u.s. nexus. the justice has sounded skeptical of broadening this law, the application of this loss in these kind of cases. connell: peter barnes, thank you very much. dagen: you want even more on the supreme court. we have judge andrew napolitano talking with us about protecting the information on your cell phone. connell: that is coming up a little bit later on in the hour. one of the big name banks got a big write up over the weekend. we will tell you more about that coming up next. we are all up today. here are some more winners on today's s&p 500. ♪ dagen: voters are stubborn. 85% of you say you have your candidate and are not changing your mind. what are president obama and romney doing to win over the other 15%? here's that bank that connell was talking about, goldman sachs getting a big write-up from barron's over the weekend. we will tell you why. and your pictures, your text messages even your whereabouts, is this private information fair game for the federal government? connell: breaking news that's just come in from federal reserve board announcing a 9 million dollars
projects that the united states will be the strongest of the world's rich economies. u.s. growth is forecast to average 3%, much stronger than that was germany or france, at 1.2%, or even canada at 2.3%. increasingly the evidence suggests that the united states has come out of the financial crisis of 2008 in better shape than its peers because of the actions of its government. perhaps the most important cause of america's relative health is the federal reserve. ben bernanke understood the depths of the problem early and responded energetically and creatively. the clearest vindication of his actions has been that the european central bank after charting an opposite course for three years with disastrous results, has now adopted policies similar to the fed's, and thus avoided a potential lehman-like collapse in europe. the leading experts on financial crises argue that the united states is performing better than most countries in similar circumstances in history. consumers are paying down debt, and consumer confidence is at its highest levels since september, 2007. every american r
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,052 (some duplicates have been removed)